Trapper's Story

Trapper's Story

In January of 2015, a skinny, sad, 6 year old male hound was transferred to BDAR from a rural WY shelter. His past before that was unclear, but what we did know was that the dog, who we called Trapper, had had a rough life. Shy and malnourished, with a dull coat and and a faraway look, Trapper came to BDAR in the hope that the individualized care provided by a loving foster home would bring out the beauty and potential in him, and lead to a loving, forever home.

The Role of our Rescue

The Role of our Rescue

Even though the term “Rescue” is becoming more common, there are many who don’t know exactly what they are, or the role they play in any given community. While it can vary from place to place, at BDAR we serve to fill a gap in animal welfare that previously didn’t exist. Our rescue doesn’t replace an animal shelter, but serves as a resource for animals before or after they enter the shelter.

Twelve.

Twelve.

Twelve. 


That’s how many puppies Zoe had. She’s not even a year old and her immature body is hard at work trying to raise this huge family. 


Zoe was left by her people at an overcrowded shelter in Wyoming just weeks before her delivery date. This happy, sweet dog waited at the front of her kennel, belly heavy with babies, hopefully wagging her tail at every passerby. Thankfully, a foster home was available for Zoe, one with the determination and compassion needed to help see her through the whelping and raising of her litter. 

Why Foster?

Why Foster?

We have heard ‘em all folks…Reasons why people choose not to foster a dog or cat in need.  And it isn’t like we aren’t listening, agreeing, or sympathizing. We really do. It isn’t an easy thing to do. It is a big, sometimes inconvenient, commitment. However, there are some things you may not have thought of when it comes to taking in your first foster animal.

Why I Support Black Dog Animal Rescue

Why I Support Black Dog Animal Rescue

A decade ago a new Wyoming pet rescue appeared on the scene. Based in Cheyenne, this group of volunteers saw a need to save dogs in our state from euthanasia. They began at a facility in the community where I live: Casper’s Metro Animal Control. Dogs there were being killed at an alarming rate. Seeing an opportunity to save dogs’ lives, Britney Wallesch and others stepped in, seeing the “black dogs,” the ones people overlooked, with Black Dog Animal Rescue (BDAR). Now, ten years later, Britney and her committed crew have ridden many waves to become a significantly strong voice for dogs and cats in Wyoming and the surrounding region.

Owner Surrendered Pets and Medical Expenses Overwhelm in early June

Owner Surrendered Pets and Medical Expenses Overwhelm in early June

Most of our adoptions work out well. In fact, over 80% of the animals adopted from BDAR remain in their homes. However, it is not uncommon for adoptions to not be a good fit, and for pets to be returned shortly after adoption, say within about 90 days. After that, we will still accept them back, but we consider those pets to be private surrenders. If the pet makes it three months in the home without problems and then get returned, we have to assume it is due to circumstances beyond our control at the time of adoption. 

Recently, we have been flooded by these types of surrenders.

Daisy's Story

Daisy's Story

Daisy originally came to BDAR in December 2015 from Hobbs, NM where she was found as a stray. She was adopted almost a month later, kept for 11 more months, and then returned for not getting along with the children in her house. She does have a nervous demeanor when small kids are around, but nothing reactive so we happily put her back into the BDAR’s care. Now it’s December 2016 and Daisy is back with Ray and Wendy, her foster family. They kept her, enjoying her company and fun antics, for a month before she was adopted again.